In Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking,’ Arranged Marriage Is The Anti-Entanglement

Five years ago, I met with a matchmaker. I went in scornful. Like many of my progressive South Asian peers, I denounced arranged marriage as offensive and regressive. But when the matchmaker recited her lengthy questionnaire, I grasped, if just for a beat, why people did things this way. Do you believe in a higher power? No idea. Should your partner share your creative interests? Must read, though preferably not write, novels. Do you want children?

Which Couples From ‘Indian Matchmaking’ Are Still Together In 2020?

In the beginning, we both were talking to each other over the phone and discovered that we have so many thi Read more. My parents were searching a guy for me since 5 years but couldn’t get suitable match.

Ever since Netflix featured the series Indian Matchmaking, Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia has become a global name.

Ketaki Desai and Sonam Joshi. Naina Hiranandani, co-founder of matchmaking service Sirf Coffee, says that dietary preferences have become very important to people. What are you going to do, check his stools every day? Dating coach Simran Mangharam has also noticed this trend. Refrain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks, name calling or inciting hatred against any community.

Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines by marking them offensive. Let’s work together to keep the conversation civil.

Series Review: Indian Matchmaking

The Netflix hit “Indian Matchmaking” has stirred up conversations about issues like parental preference in marriage, cultural progress, casteism — and ghosting. Taparia answered questions via email from Mumbai, discussing why none of the matches worked out, her own arranged marriage and how business is booming despite the coronavirus pandemic. Sima Taparia: They are not separate things.

Matchmaking is just a tool to help people find a life partner. In India, the process also often involves parents.

The hit show itself is about a matchmaker named Sima who helps arrange a marriage—a traditional form of courtship and matrimony in India—for.

Indian Matchmaking , the Netflix series about professional matchmaker Sima Taparia and her clients, has spawned memes, opinion columns and social media outrage across geographies. The show has been executive produced by Smriti Mundhra. In an email interview, Mundhra addresses criticism of the series and reveals whether there will be a second season. It was meant to be honest to the world of one matchmaker and a specific set of clients, and a nuanced look at the search for a life partner, which is a loaded and often triggering topic.

Are you surprised at how the show has connected across the world? How did you select the candidates for the show? First and foremost, it started with who was willing to go through this process with cameras on them. We also did some outreach on our own. Of the group that was willing, we focused on the people who were the most open, ready to be honest and represented different points of view and different aspects of the Indian and diasporic experience.

Why are they mostly from the same faith — Hindus with one Sikh? Within that, we pushed for as much diversity as possible without resorting to tokenism or stunt casting.

Indian Matchmaking: The ‘cringe-worthy’ Netflix show that is a huge hit

Follow Us. The controversial Netflix show has reignited debate over traditional marriage matches, but without interrogating harmful stereotypes, says Meehika Barua. One evening in late November when I was heading for a meeting in Holborn, my Indian friend, who is 25, texted me to say that she was getting married.

Indian Matchmaking perpetuates stereotypes, commodifies women and lacks diversity – but that’s the reality of India today. Netflix’s hit reality.

This book is an extensive and thorough exploration of the ways in which the middle class in India select their spouse. Using the prism of matchmaking, this book critically unpacks the concept of the ‘modern’ and traces the importance of moralities and values in the making of middle class identities, by bringing to the fore intersections and dynamics of caste, class, gender, and neoliberalism.

The author discusses a range of issues: romantic relationships among youth, use of online technology and of professional services like matrimonial agencies and detective agencies, encounters of love and heartbreak, impact of experiences of pain and humiliation on spouse-selection, and the involvement of family in matchmaking. Based on this comprehensive account, she elucidates how the categories of ‘love’ and ‘arranged’ marriages fall short of explaining, in its entirety and essence, the contemporary process of spouse-selection in urban India.

Though the ethnographic research has been conducted in India, this book is of relevance to social scientists studying matchmaking practices, youth cultures, modernity and the middle class in other societies, particularly in parts of Asia. While being based on thorough scholarship, the book is written in accessible language to appeal to a larger audience. Jindal Global University, India. She was also a Visiting Scholar at St. Only valid for books with an ebook version.

Indian Matchmaking: Netflix’s ‘divisive’ dating show causes storm

Indian Matchmaking was a hit with desi audiences and some contestants got more attention than others. Aparna Shewakramani has been through a roller coaster of hate and love online, ever since the show made its debut on Netflix. As for Aparna herself, she thinks someone else was represented worse than her. More so than any other character, even me.

Five years ago, I met with a matchmaker. I was reporting a feature on India’s $​billion marriage-industrial complex — which includes.

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy. Taparia travels across India and the U. Indian Matchmaking has been controversial in the Indian community, both among people in India, and among the diaspora.

But my wife and I were both put off something different: the lack of socioeconomic diversity on display. Indian Matchmaking is available to stream on Netflix. Dick short story, Doug Quaid Arnold Schwarzenegger is trapped in a mundane life, but dreams of journeying to the Red Planet. With the click of a button, the construction worker can get a week of Mars-hopping adventures as a galactic secret agent burned into his brain, as if it all really happened.

He may actually be a secret agent from Mars, whose memory was wiped by government thugs. Is Quaid actually a Schwarzenegger-esque hero, or is everything past the memory-implant sequence just the dream Rekall has sold him? Total Recall is streaming on Netflix and purchasable on Amazon and other digital platforms.

We Need to Talk About ‘Indian Matchmaking’

It might seem strange to invoke an Alice Walker essay in connection with the new Netflix reality series, Indian Matchmaking , but, here we go. The essay is revolutionary for that coinage. Walker explicitly draws a connection between skin color and marriage. Walker tells us two smaller, adjoining stories, about herself and a friend in their single days. In the Netflix series Indian Matchmaking , the importance of skin color arrives quickly in talk of matrimony, as do other facets of packaged appearance, the sorts that indicate a notion of a stratified universe: This level of education matches with this one, this shade of skin with this, this height with this, these family values with these, this caste with this, this region with this, and so on.

The controversial Netflix show Indian Matchmaking has reignited debate over traditional arranged marriages in India, but without interrogating.

By Naman Ramachandran. Netflix launched in India in , and homegrown commissions became available from in a market that thrives on local fare. They were replaced eventually by Monika Shergill in , who joined existing director of originals Srishti Behl Arya. The same year, the Los Angeles-based Mundhra pitched her idea for an Indian dating show with a global-facing matchmaker to Netflix in the U.

Over in India, Netflix — trailing behind turbocharged local streamers and global rival Amazon Prime Video — was trying to grow its customer base by trialling cheap subscriptions. The clients, all of Indian origin, are based in India or the U. Organised Chaos fixer Ricky Saxena contacted some matchmakers over late and early to shortlist them for the show, but Taparia remained their first preference because Mundhra was already familiar with her.

Throughout this process, the Netflix India office was not involved. Inevitably, criticism followed, with the show being accused of not being inclusive enough, and promoting casteism.

Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking’ Is The Talk Of India — And Not In A Good Way

Every reality show has at least one villain. As Sima and the show itself frequently remind us, arranged marriage is not quite the form of social control it used to be; everyone here emphasizes that they have the right to choose or refuse the matches presented to them. But as becomes especially clear when Sima works in India, that choice is frequently and rather roughly pressured by an anvil of social expectations and family duty.

In the most extreme case, a year-old prospective groom named Akshay Jakhete is practically bullied by his mother, Preeti, into choosing a bride. Indian Matchmaking smartly reclaims and updates the arranged marriage myth for the 21st century, demystifying the process and revealing how much romance and heartache is baked into the process even when older adults are meddling every step of the way.

In the Netflix series Indian Matchmaking, the importance of skin color arrives quickly in talk of matrimony, as do other facets of packaged.

On Netflix’s “Indian Matchmaking,” marriage consultant Sima Taparia travels the world to meet with hopeful clients and help them find the perfect match for an arranged marriage. The format of the show is simple. Hopeful brides- and grooms-to-be meet with Taparia — often with their overbearing parents in tow — for an initial consultation. Criteria are laid out, potential suitors are presented on paper, dates are arranged, and then it’s up to the couple to decide if it’s a match.

In some respects, the producers should be commended. This is a show that turns away from the “big fat Indian wedding” trope and offers something fresh: a look at how some traditional-facing couples meet through the services of a professional matchmaker. The characters’ stories — as well as cringier moments — play out in entertaining ways, at times revealing the absurdities and awkwardness of matchmaking.

I laughed when, for example, Taparia sought the consultation of an astrologist and a face reader. Matchmaker Sima Taparia meets with hopeful clients. Credit: Netflix.

How the reality show ‘Indian Matchmaking’ hides the reality

I was on the phone with my mother, who lives in Pune, India, complaining about Indian Matchmaking , when she brought up the marriage proposal. I knew she agreed. I scoffed. But watch Indian Matchmaking , and you may end the eight-episode arc of the smartly edited, highly bingeable show with a misleading idea of how arranged marriages actually work. The Netflix reality show follows Sima Taparia, a matchmaker from Mumbai whose pen-and-paper spreadsheets of potential suitors is far from the most outdated thing about her.

She flies back and forth between the U.

Smriti Mundhra is not at all bothered that people are talking about colorism, sexism and elitism when it comes to “Indian Matchmaking.”.

Sima Taparia, professional matchmaker reveals her arrange marriage tale. Credits: Instagram. From different memes on her matchmaking skills to her constant efforts in making people meet each other,. Sima has become famous among all. After creating love stories for millions, Sima has revealed the story of her own marriage in an Instagram post recently. She got engaged to her husband Anup Taparia in December of ‘

Xclusive Match – Matchmaking for the Urban Indian